Great Pyramid 3d

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In 2017, a research team formed by Nagoya University and other institutions announced the discovery of an unknown giant void inside the Great Pyramid of Giza located in Egypt.

The government of Egypt designated the Higashi Nippon International University for “The Great Pyramid Project” launched in April 2018. Sakuji Yoshimura, President of Higashi Nippon International University and project leader, recalls: “The Minister of Antiquities from Egypt called, and wanted to know if this announcement could be verified scientifically.

Pix4D, therefore, started a scientific verification process where the inside of the pyramid was scanned with cameras and the data converted to 3D models.”. See “What is Remote Sensing?” for getting basic pieces of information about Remote Sensing.

JEPICO, with its high-performance 100-million pixel camera, and Hitachi Systems, which has advanced technical capabilities and extensive experience in 3D modeling with images using Pix4Dmapper, joined this project as partners.

The key to accurately modeling the interior of the Great Pyramid, where lighting conditions are challenging, was the project members’ know-how in capturing data, as well as the technical expertise in utilizing various features of Pix4Dmapper software.

Even for the dark and narrow King’s Chamber inside the Great Pyramid, the team succeeded in generating an accurate 3D model that provides a faithful reproduction of the real colors and shapes.

Now that remote investigation is enabled by the accurate 3D reconstructions, the team has hopes for new archeological discoveries, such as the ability to distinguish materials by their image color.

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Yoshimura comments, “I was simply astounded at how, instead of using CGI for reproduction or similar methods, real images were used for the modeling, using the colors of the actual objects.

Clear and sharp images and videos like these of the King’s Chamber have never been seen before and will be extremely useful in future pyramid studies.”.

Source: High-accuracy 3D modelling inside the Great Pyramid. In 2017, a research team formed by Nagoya University and other institutions announced the discovery of an unknown giant void inside the Great Pyramid of Giza located in Egypt.

The government of Egypt designated the Higashi Nippon International University for “The Great Pyramid Project” launched in April 2018.

Sakuji Yoshimura, President of Higashi Nippon International University and project leader, recalls: “The Minister of Antiquities from Egypt called, and wanted to know if this announcement could be verified scientifically.

Pix4D, therefore, started a scientific verification process where the inside of the pyramid was scanned with cameras and the data converted to 3D models.”.

See “What is Remote Sensing?” for getting basic pieces of information about Remote Sensing. JEPICO, with its high-performance 100-million pixel camera, and Hitachi Systems, which has advanced technical capabilities and extensive experience in 3D modeling with images using Pix4Dmapper, joined this project as partners.

The key to accurately modeling the interior of the Great Pyramid, where lighting conditions are challenging, was the project members’ know-how in capturing data, as well as the technical expertise in utilizing various features of Pix4Dmapper software.

Even for the dark and narrow King’s Chamber inside the Great Pyramid, the team succeeded in generating an accurate 3D model that provides a faithful reproduction of the real colors and shapes.

Now that remote investigation is enabled by the accurate 3D reconstructions, the team has hopes for new archeological discoveries, such as the ability to distinguish materials by their image color.

Yoshimura comments, “I was simply astounded at how, instead of using CGI for reproduction or similar methods, real images were used for the modeling, using the colors of the actual objects.

Clear and sharp images and videos like these of the King’s Chamber have never been seen before and will be extremely useful in future pyramid studies.”.

Source: High-accuracy 3D modelling inside the Great Pyramid. The Great Pyramid Of Egypt has been a source of wonder and amazement for archeologists and scientists for millennia.

Its mysteries might finally be uncovered with the help of advanced technology, possibly revealing details never seen before.

Little is known for certain about this massive structure's origins. The largest of the world's ancient pyramids, the Great Pyramid Of Egypt has been the subject of fantastic speculation about lost building techniques and hidden knowledge.

Standing over 450 feet tall, the Great Pyramid Of Egypt dwarfs most ancient structures and was the tallest constructed object in the world for thousands of years.

It is still among the world's most massive buildings, with an estimated weight of over 6 million tons.

Being constructed of limestone, granite, and marble, the outer white limestone would have shone brightly in the desert sun, however, earthquake damage, weathering, and 'borrowing' materials for other buildings have taken a toll on the appearance, leaving only a few of the outer casing stones in place.

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As fascinating as the outer appearance of the Great Pyramid Of Egypt is, the interior is where the mystery lies.

Scientists are hoping to shed light on hidden details with the use of muon tomography. Known as the Explore the Great Pyramid (EGP) mission, details of the planning were recently published in Cornell University's arXiv (via Universe Today).

Using a muon scanning system that should be 100 times more sensitive than previous designs, scientists will peer inside the Great Pyramid of Egypt to find any hidden details and refine the work that has been done so far by the ScanPyramid team.

ScanPyramid made a huge discovery of an unknown cavity within the structure in 2017, which has come to be known as the Big Void.

The new Great Pyramid exploration mission uses muons just as ScanPyramid did, however, it is a larger array that is designed to capture much more data in shorter periods of time. Taking a total of 36 scans, nine on each side from the base of the Great Pyramid, the expectation is to complete the scans in about two years.

This process takes this long because muon tomography relies upon a huge number of cosmic rays penetrating the structure at various angles in order to get a three-dimensional density scan.

The resolution will be one cubic meter, which is a large volume but small in comparison to the Great Pyramid of Egypt. By using muons which come from cosmic rays, the secrets of the Great Pyramid Of Egypt might finally be revealed without damaging the ancient structure and having minimal impact on other research and tourist activity.

Next: Can You Solve The 40 Year Mystery Of Stephen Hawking's Blackboard Doodles? Source: Cornell University (via Universe Today).

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Hitachi Systems and JEPICO partnered up to capture and document the insides of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. In 2017, a research team formed by Nagoya University and other institutions announced the discovery of an unknown giant void inside the Great Pyramid of Giza located in Egypt.

The government of Egypt designated the Higashi Nippon International University for "The Great Pyramid Project" launched in April 2018. Sakuji Yoshimura, President of Higashi Nippon International University and project leader, recalls: “The Egyptian Minister of Antiquities called, and wanted to know if this announcement could be verified scientifically.

Therefore, we started a scientific verification process where the inside of the pyramid was scanned with cameras and then the data converted to 3D models.”.

JEPICO, with its high-performance 100-million pixel camera, and Hitachi Systems, which has advanced technical capabilities and extensive experience in 3D modeling with images using Pix4Dmapper, joined this project as partners.

The key to accurately modeling the interior of the Great Pyramid, where lighting conditions are challenging, was the project members’ know-how in capturing data, as well as the technical expertise in utilizing various features of Pix4Dmapper photogrammetry software.

Even for the dark and narrow King’s Chamber inside the Great Pyramid, the JEPICO and Hitachi Systems team succeeded in generating an accurate 3D model that provides a faithful reproduction of the real colors and shapes.

Now that remote investigation is enabled by the accurate 3D reconstructions, the team has high hopes for new archeological discoveries, such as the ability to distinguish materials by their image color.

Yoshimura comments, "I was simply astounded at how, instead of using CGI (computer generated imagery) for reproduction or similar methods, real images were used for the modeling, using the colors of the actual objects.

Clear and sharp images and videos like these of the King's Chamber have never been seen before and will be extremely useful in future pyramid studies."

Special thanks to the members of Hitachi Systems and to ImageONE, our premier reseller in Japan, for their help in preparing this article.

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