Great Pyramid Model

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The Pyramid Model for Promoting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children(Pyramid Model). The Pyramid Model is a conceptual framework of evidence-based practices for promoting young children’s healthy social and emotional development. The Pyramid Model provides guidance for:. early childhood special education personnel. early intervention personnel. early educators. other professionals. The Pyramid Model was developed by two national, federally-funded research and training centers: The Center for the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) and Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Youth Children (TACSEI).

These centers’ faculty represent nationally recognized researchers and program developers in the areas of social skills and challenging behavior. It is our goal to provide states with the technical assistance and training to establish the systems and policies needed to adopt and sustain the implementation of the Pyramid Model.

NCPMI is focused on the implementation of the Pyramid Model to promote the social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes of young children birth to five, address disparities in discipline practices, promote family engagement, use data for decision-making, and foster inclusion of children with, and at risk for, developmental delays and disabilities. Based on over a decade of evaluation data, the Pyramid Model has shown to be a sound framework for early care and education systems. Now let’s take a closer look at each level of the Pyramid Model. Hitachi Systems and JEPICO partnered up to capture and document the insides of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt.

In 2017, a research team formed by Nagoya University and other institutions announced the discovery of an unknown giant void inside the Great Pyramid of Giza located in Egypt. The government of Egypt designated the Higashi Nippon International University for "The Great Pyramid Project" launched in April 2018.

Sakuji Yoshimura, President of Higashi Nippon International University and project leader, recalls: “The Egyptian Minister of Antiquities called, and wanted to know if this announcement could be verified scientifically.

Therefore, we started a scientific verification process where the inside of the pyramid was scanned with cameras and then the data converted to 3D models.”.

JEPICO, with its high-performance 100-million pixel camera, and Hitachi Systems, which has advanced technical capabilities and extensive experience in 3D modeling with images using Pix4Dmapper, joined this project as partners.

The key to accurately modeling the interior of the Great Pyramid, where lighting conditions are challenging, was the project members’ know-how in capturing data, as well as the technical expertise in utilizing various features of Pix4Dmapper photogrammetry software.

Even for the dark and narrow King’s Chamber inside the Great Pyramid, the JEPICO and Hitachi Systems team succeeded in generating an accurate 3D model that provides a faithful reproduction of the real colors and shapes.

Now that remote investigation is enabled by the accurate 3D reconstructions, the team has high hopes for new archeological discoveries, such as the ability to distinguish materials by their image color.

Yoshimura comments, "I was simply astounded at how, instead of using CGI (computer generated imagery) for reproduction or similar methods, real images were used for the modeling, using the colors of the actual objects. Clear and sharp images and videos like these of the King's Chamber have never been seen before and will be extremely useful in future pyramid studies." Special thanks to the members of Hitachi Systems and to ImageONE, our premier reseller in Japan, for their help in preparing this article. Read the full article on Hitachi Systems’ website and watch a 4-minute video introducing the project.

Joint LiDAR and photogrammetry workflow for 3D bridge model. Using specialized handheld hardware for site scanning with RTK accuracy helped capture, process, and vectorize a historic stone bridge. Széchenyi Chain bridge: modeling a national monument. Two companies partnered up to create a 3D model of the famous Chain Bridge in Budapest with photogrammetry software PIX4Dmapper . Photogrammetry and augmented reality: a new way to travel. Jeju Island, a popular tourist destination in South Korea, was partly digitized in 2019. Now, the process is expanding to reach a new level.

In 2017, a research team formed by Nagoya University and other institutions announced the discovery of an unknown giant void inside the Great Pyramid of Giza located in Egypt. The government of Egypt designated the Higashi Nippon International University for “The Great Pyramid Project” launched in April 2018. Sakuji Yoshimura, President of Higashi Nippon International University and project leader, recalls: “The Minister of Antiquities from Egypt called, and wanted to know if this announcement could be verified scientifically. Pix4D, therefore, started a scientific verification process where the inside of the pyramid was scanned with cameras and the data converted to 3D models.”. See “What is Remote Sensing?” for getting basic pieces of information about Remote Sensing.

JEPICO, with its high-performance 100-million pixel camera, and Hitachi Systems, which has advanced technical capabilities and extensive experience in 3D modeling with images using Pix4Dmapper, joined this project as partners.

The key to accurately modeling the interior of the Great Pyramid, where lighting conditions are challenging, was the project members’ know-how in capturing data, as well as the technical expertise in utilizing various features of Pix4Dmapper software. Even for the dark and narrow King’s Chamber inside the Great Pyramid, the team succeeded in generating an accurate 3D model that provides a faithful reproduction of the real colors and shapes.

Now that remote investigation is enabled by the accurate 3D reconstructions, the team has hopes for new archeological discoveries, such as the ability to distinguish materials by their image color. Yoshimura comments, “I was simply astounded at how, instead of using CGI for reproduction or similar methods, real images were used for the modeling, using the colors of the actual objects.

Clear and sharp images and videos like these of the King’s Chamber have never been seen before and will be extremely useful in future pyramid studies.”. Source: High-accuracy 3D modelling inside the Great Pyramid. 146.6 m (481 ft) or 280 cubits (originally). 138.5 m (454 ft) (contemporary). The Great Pyramid of Giza[a] is the largest Egyptian pyramid and tomb of Fourth Dynasty pharaoh Khufu.

Built in the 26th century BC during a period of around 27 years,[3] it is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain largely intact.

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